What Is Chase’s 5/24 Policy And How Does It Work?


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I’ve had quite a few questions asking about Chase’s 5/24 credit card policy so it seems appropriate write a brief summary of what 5/24 means, how the policy works, who it affects and what exemptions to the policy there are.

Chase’s 5/24 Policy

In brief, Chase’s 5/24 policy says that if you’ve been approved for 5 or more credit cards over the past 24 months Chase will not approve you for another credit card.

That’s the gist of the policy but it has nuances that you’ll need to know:

  1. It’s not just credit cards from Chase that count towards the 5 card maximum – approved cards from Amex, Citi, Barclays etc… also count.
  2. Not all of Chase’s credit cards are subject to the 5/24 rule
  3. Not all business cards will count towards the 5 card maximum as not all business cards get reported on a person’s personal credit profile.
  4. Authorised user accounts will count against the 5 card maximum but there are widespread reports of people calling up Chase, explaining that they’re only an authorised user and having their applications resubmitted if they’e been rejected thanks to 5/24.
  5. Product changes (when one card is converted to another) do not count against the 5 card maximum as product changes are not reported on a person’s credit profile as a new account.

Hotel Rewards Credit Cards

What Counts & What Doesn’t?

While you’d think that Chase would make sure that all of the credit cards it issues are subject to the 5/24 rule that’s not actually the case.

Chase Cards subject to 5/24:

  • All Ultimate Rewards credit cards
  • United Airlines co-branded personal and business cards
  • Marriott co-branded personal and business cards

Chase Cards not subject to 5/24:

  • Aer Lingus Visa (expected but not confirmed)
  • British Airways Visa
  • Hyatt Visa
  • Iberia Visa
  • IHG Rewards Club card
  • Ritz-Carlton Rewards Visa

It’s not only some of Chase’s cards that aren’t subject to the 5/24 policy, there are other cards that evade it too.

Because most small business cards aren’t reported on a person’s personal credit profile Chase has no way of knowing whether or not you hold these cards….so they can’t count towards the 5 card maximum.

Examples of other cards not generally subject to Chase’s 5/24 policy:

  • The Business Platinum® Card from American Express
  • The Business Gold Rewards Card from American Express
  • The Blue Business Plus Credit Card from American Express
  • Citi Business AAdvantage Platinum Select
  • Costco Anywhere Business Card by Citi

Chase already knows which of its business cards you have applied for so, generally speaking, Chase business cards will count towards the 5 card maximum imposed by the 5/24 rule.

Business Credit Cards

Important Things To Remember

  1. Even if a Chase card isn’t subject to the 5/24 rule (like the Hyatt Visa), if you’re approved for the card it will still count towards the 5 card maximum when it comes to applications for cards that are subject to 5/24.
  2. Chase appears to show flexibility now and then – there are reports of people who have hit their 5 card maximum being approved for cards that are subject to the 5/24 rule. There aren’t all that many of these reports but they definitely exist.

Bottom Line

Chase issues some of the best rewards credit cards on the market (I love the Ultimate Rewards cards) so it’s important to understand how the 5/24 rule works and how it will affect you.

The most important thing to remember is that, if you’re looking to apply for more than one credit card and you’re under the 5/24 threshold, you should make sure you apply for any Chase cards you’re interested in first before then applying for cards from the likes of Citi and Amex.